Phenomenology is the study of lived experience from a first-person perspective. As of yet, it has not been applied to incels. Here I will argue that it should be.

An incel is an involuntary celibate, a person who is unable to find a romantic partner despite desiring one. Previously ignored, incels have recently gained a staggering prominence among scholars of violent extremism. For example, this year the Royal Canadian Mounted Police added incels to their Ideologically Motivated Violent Extremism classification, effectively labeling them as terrorists.

However, from the point of view of incels, this is all rather baffling; while a handful may fit the mold, violence against the public by an ideology of extremism is as foreign to incels as it is to the reader.

Most academics do present their work by stating that the vast majority of incels are neither violent nor extremist. However, as existing research magnifies the attention given to the extremist variant, the impression is given that all incels are alike, and all are a danger. This is a failure of contextualization, one whose results we have seen before as research developed in the wake of the 9/11 attacks: Islam became securitized, not because it was a security threat, but rather because the majority of attention was focused on a few violent extremists, tainting in the process every other Western non-extremist Muslim.

For incels, the misattribution of their beliefs and desires has caused trouble for many of them: How are they to open up and discuss their plights of loneliness and hopelessness if public perception is that incels are people only interested in violence? The answer is that often they simply can’t.

Perhaps worse still, scorn received from outsiders to the community often leads to a process of chiseling, chipping away at the mental health of incels. Not only must then they carry a burden of solitude, but they also must retreat from the public eye in order to avoid further ostracizement. In practice, such alienation may eventually compound into mental disorders like anxiety and depression, or in extreme cases into self-harm and even suicide.

A proposed solution to this issue is phenomenology. For one, responsible research should seek to avoid unnecessary securitization and promote effective de-escalation. Secondly, resources should be significantly expended towards understanding inceldom as a life situation. The result will be a wider and better understanding of incels at large, as well as a more accurate portrayal of the community to the public.

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Comments to: Incel
Phenomenology
  • Avatar
    July 13, 2020

    Strong first post, graycel

    Reply
  • Avatar
    July 15, 2020

    Based and High IQ

    @Mods

    Pin this.

    Reply
  • Avatar
    July 16, 2020

    Strong first post

    Reply
  • Avatar
    July 17, 2020

    Nicely done. Keep up the good work! I am afraid to participate in the incel community because I fear people will attack and destroy me for it. I am a virgin over 30. I have no hopes for the future. I just want to be able to talk to other lonely men who understand me and know what this feels like. I’m not a terrorist. I’ve never hurt anyone physically in my life. I hope that maybe one day the world will wake up. We shouldn’t have to be fearful to admit something that should be simply to say and talk about.

    Reply
    • Avatar
      July 30, 2020

      I think the incel community is full of men hurt from societies norms and false values. why don‘t you try to take that anger and make something positive out of it? like making music or gardening? I believe as long as you can live with yourself you will attract people who appreciate you. not only lonely men from internet can understand you. women also deal with these false hurtful values being pushed onto them.

  • Avatar
    July 17, 2020

    this is great

    Reply
  • Avatar
    July 17, 2020

    are you aware that phenomenology is a stream of philosophy and not an empirical research method

    Reply
    • Avatar
      July 19, 2020

      Yes. However, the study of a topic under the lens of a field is something we do every day. Phenomenology is the study of the structures of experience, and we can apply this perspective to the field of incels. It is a tool that we can use to carry out research.

  • Avatar
    July 19, 2020

    I empathize and understand the incel situation, however, by spreading hate you only create more hate guys. Incels are not terrorists, thats for sure. But admit, you all share hatred for women and people with more success in general. Nobody is going to take seriously anything you say until you change few perspectives in your lives.
    I am aware that in these world some people weren’t very fortunate (looks, money, being born into a warzone). For some people as an incel being unable to find romance and relationships. It really could (or may not) be over for some of the incel people if they feel that way. Sometimes there is nothing we can do to make things better, but there is really no point in making our lives even more miserable by being hateful towards others.

    Reply
    • Avatar
      July 20, 2020

      Quite the contrary actually. It’s a common misconception. While it’s easy to see hatred from a minority of users. Most don’t really post at all. It’s also not helped by people finding posts that direct hatred towards women and labelling those men as “incels”. Often times when it’s clear they’re not and have had/still have partners.

      Inceldom is a life circumstance. Most incels don’t harbour hatred towards women. And those that do, just like anyone else it’s usually just towards society in general. But I digress. There’s so many examples of incels out there that worship women, or incels that just simply see them as equals. People they want to befriend but just can’t.

      This is one of the biggest faults I find with people who try to address the incel phenomena. They treat it as a mindset or an act. As opposed to a circumstance. In doing so I feel people inadvertently ignore some of the core issues at hand. And that’s very harmful and doesn’t really address this issue.

      There’s already a term for people who hate women. They’re called misogynists. As with any other Stereotype applied to incels. They’re all separate issues applied unto inceldom wrongly, just to ignore the real issue. those other issues can be addressed outside of inceldom. However inceldom is something that’s bestowed upon tons of people far and wide and most don’t fit any of the Stereotypes. So their issues get ignored. And it’s a shame

    • Avatar
      July 20, 2020

      Frail, thank you for your polite answer. You made a good point. I think that by building a diplomatic relations between incel group and the outside world is a great step ahead. Some may percieve incels as threat because few of them lost it and went on a killing spree. But that doesn’t mean all Incels are murderers. Putting everyone in a same bag is not a good thing, but that also goes for incels I mean (not everyone is a shallow stacy or chad, and not every incel is a hatefull asocial).

      I studied the incel slangs and ideas for some time now, because I was courious. About the pills from matrix etc. I also read the manifesto from Elliot Rodger. So I am little bit aware of what is going on.

      This blog was a good idea to talk openly with everyone about this issue. Incels made their own locked website (which I totally understand to prevent evading trolls and keeping order in a place where incels feel save), but I believe a positive connection with everyone else is a key to get rid of such stereotypes.

      Good luck in your future endevours.

    • Avatar
      July 28, 2020

      “you all share hatred for women”

      An idiotic statement if there ever was one, dear mind-reader. I hope you are a troll.

  • Avatar
    July 21, 2020

    Any time. Happy to discuss. And you’re deffinitely correct Peter. It would be much better if society and incels were able to just get along so to speak. It’s all we wish for I guess. It’s a bit of a shadowed area that people forget in general though. Most incels have tried since young to become one with society.

    Alot of people think it’s us that try to want to ‘force’ society to come to us. But it’s so far from. It’s often a case of, us just being outcasted. Outcasts aren’t new, prejudice due to looks, ugliness, race, neurotypicality etc. None of them are new. Hell they’re even observable in children’s cartoons unfortunately. But people don’t seem ready yet to admit that they are prejudiced.

    The toxicity observable is there I guess for sure. But so it is from non-incels in abundance. People even label non-incel as incels nowadays if they express an unpopular opinion. Which in the end only gets pushed onto actual incels who have done little wrong. Alot of its venting, some of its false flags, or just bait. The ones that are serious make up a small minority of actual thoughts and posts. Ironic because people understand this when it comes to regular people in society but if it’s an outcasted guy. He’s always deemed suspect and weird.

    A rapport would be much better tbh. It’s Stereotypes that have existed and adapted over several decades that have perpetuated a lot of this. I still do consider empathy and compassion to be a bit of joke, because I see how biased and how selectively they’re applied to certain people due to certain aspects. Often physical aspects too. Racism for example is a clear form of lookist behaviour. Something I think is utterly ridiculous.

    Thank you for your reply btw.

    Reply
  • Avatar
    August 3, 2020

    Right here is the right site for everyone who wants
    to understand this topic. You know so much its almost tough to
    argue with you (not that I personally would want to…).

    You definitely put a brand new spin on a subject that has been discussed
    for ages. Excellent stuff, just excellent!

    Reply
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